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Bees and Wasps


Africanized Honey Bees
Both European and Africanized honey bees vigorously defend their nests from intruders and they are very difficult to differentiate. Africanized honey bees are more easily provoked, respond in greater numbers and are defensive over a larger area. They have been known to chase potential threats for up to a quarter mile. Sensitive individuals, senior citizens, small children, pet owners, and heavy equipment operators should take particular care to avoid provoking a wild nest. Listen for their buzzing and be watchful for the flight paths of numerous bees. If you get too close to a nest, the bees guarding the nest may display a defensive behavior by flying aggressively at your head. Retreat quickly, yet calmly. Do not flail your arms and avoid crushing bees.








European Honey Bees
L.A. Bugs maintains staff which are specially trained in the identification of EHB and AHB as well as wasps and their nests. Armed with the necessary safety equipment and training, we can safely eliminate the infestation and seal any openings, preventing re-infestations. We also are specially equipped to remove wasp nest regardless of the location. Please do not attempt to engage or remove bees, wasps, or their hives on your own. Bees and wasps are very aggressive and territorial creatures and will sting if provoked. If you see swarming or suspect you have a bee or wasp problem, please call L.A. Bugs to eliminate the threat in and around your home.








Wasp Nests
A single wasp begins construction on a nest that may eventually house more than 500 adults. The queen lays four or five eggs in a small comb protected by several layers of papery material. The wasps continue the nest's expansion, leaving the queen to egg laying. By the end of the summer, a large nest contains males, female workers, and a number of specially nurtured new queens, which leave the nest to begin their own nests come springtime.